Bonus: A historical look at brain injuries, CTE and the NFL

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As we are roughly halfway through Season 1, it feels like the perfect time to take a breath and give ourselves a bit of a history lesson on the issue of brain injuries and sports. So to that end, I’ve brought in an expert.

His name is Stephen Casper and he is a Professor of History at Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York. Professor Casper has a PhD in the History of Medicine, as well as a Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience and Biochemistry.

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He is the author of multiple papers on the history of neuroscience, as well as an upcoming book on the cultural history of head injury titled “Punch Drunk and Dementia: A Modern History of Concussion, 1870–2012.”

He is also a retained expert for the plaintiffs in concussion litigation against the National Hockey League.

Here are some highlights from the interview:

— The scientific community has known about this connection much longer than you think.
 — How the rise of sports medicine led to a (wrong) perception that brain injury research is a new thing.
 — Whether some people might be genetically predisposed to getting CTE, and what that means.
 — Why every doctor associated with the NFL and NCAA has no excuse for being unaware of this history.

I hope you enjoy my conversation with Professor Casper and that you find the information as enlightening and fascinating as I did.

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